How it Works

Deep dive


As digital ownership of what’s put online is normalized, NFTs are quickly becoming the way users upload content as.


However searching for NFTs is a mess as the data around NFTs lack a standard that is easy to search and categorize.

Want to find NFTs at a certain price point? Or how about NFTs that support a good cause? What about musicNFTs of a particular genre? These simple search queries are unable to fetch suitable results due to lack of metadata standardization, how this metadata is stored, and publicly accessible relationships (knowledge graphs) between the metadata. 

Simply put, there is too much disorganized information from different sources to make searching easy across chains and platforms.

1. Metadata standardization doesn’t exist

When NFTs are minted, a set of data which gives information about the NFT is included in the smart contract. This is called Metadata. For example, a NFT will include a title, description and some attributes when minted, yet others will not. You may find an NFT, but there could be thousands of other NFTs that are a better fit to your search query. It just doesn't have the metadata for it to be fetched as a result. This makes searching for NFTs a static experience rather than a dynamic one we’re used to in Web2 via  popular search engines like Google. 

2. Metadata is hard to parse

Metadata standardization isn’t the only hurdle in improving NFT discovery. The path to source the Metadata is also stored differently in on and off-chain instances. 

In off-chain instances metadata is often stored in a URL that links to the metadata indirectly. Along with no standardization of this metadata, these links can go offline or have complicated paths which makes it difficult to parse the data. 

While metadata on-chain is technically a better way to store necessary data, it is still expensive in comparison to off-chain.

3. Metadata siloed on multiple chains

NFT ecosystems are siloed from one another in metadata, content and communities which further hinders internet citizen’s ability to search and obtain optimal results across chains. The internet is going multichain and Web3’s NFT Metadata Standard should be multi-chain too. 

4. Lack of compounding metadata knowledge and relationships 

People search and interact with NFTs everyday, yet this knowledge is never captured. An NFT’s history should be added to enrich the NFTs metadata to help the next person find what they’re looking for!

How it Works

Deep dive


As digital ownership of what’s put online is normalized, NFTs are quickly becoming the way users upload content as.


However searching for NFTs is a mess as the data around NFTs lack a standard that is easy to search and categorize.

Want to find NFTs at a certain price point? Or how about NFTs that support a good cause? What about musicNFTs of a particular genre? These simple search queries are unable to fetch suitable results due to lack of metadata standardization, how this metadata is stored, and publicly accessible relationships (knowledge graphs) between the metadata. 

Simply put, there is too much disorganized information from different sources to make searching easy across chains and platforms.

1. Metadata standardization doesn’t exist

When NFTs are minted, a set of data which gives information about the NFT is included in the smart contract. This is called Metadata. For example, a NFT will include a title, description and some attributes when minted, yet others will not. You may find an NFT, but there could be thousands of other NFTs that are a better fit to your search query. It just doesn't have the metadata for it to be fetched as a result. This makes searching for NFTs a static experience rather than a dynamic one we’re used to in Web2 via  popular search engines like Google. 

2. Metadata is hard to parse

Metadata standardization isn’t the only hurdle in improving NFT discovery. The path to source the Metadata is also stored differently in on and off-chain instances. 

In off-chain instances metadata is often stored in a URL that links to the metadata indirectly. Along with no standardization of this metadata, these links can go offline or have complicated paths which makes it difficult to parse the data. 

While metadata on-chain is technically a better way to store necessary data, it is still expensive in comparison to off-chain.

3. Metadata siloed on multiple chains

NFT ecosystems are siloed from one another in metadata, content and communities which further hinders internet citizen’s ability to search and obtain optimal results across chains. The internet is going multichain and Web3’s NFT Metadata Standard should be multi-chain too. 

4. Lack of compounding metadata knowledge and relationships 

People search and interact with NFTs everyday, yet this knowledge is never captured. An NFT’s history should be added to enrich the NFTs metadata to help the next person find what they’re looking for!

How it Works

Deep dive


As digital ownership of what’s put online is normalized, NFTs are quickly becoming the way users upload content as.


However searching for NFTs is a mess as the data around NFTs lack a standard that is easy to search and categorize.

Want to find NFTs at a certain price point? Or how about NFTs that support a good cause? What about musicNFTs of a particular genre? These simple search queries are unable to fetch suitable results due to lack of metadata standardization, how this metadata is stored, and publicly accessible relationships (knowledge graphs) between the metadata. 

Simply put, there is too much disorganized information from different sources to make searching easy across chains and platforms.

1. Metadata standardization doesn’t exist

When NFTs are minted, a set of data which gives information about the NFT is included in the smart contract. This is called Metadata. For example, a NFT will include a title, description and some attributes when minted, yet others will not. You may find an NFT, but there could be thousands of other NFTs that are a better fit to your search query. It just doesn't have the metadata for it to be fetched as a result. This makes searching for NFTs a static experience rather than a dynamic one we’re used to in Web2 via  popular search engines like Google. 

2. Metadata is hard to parse

Metadata standardization isn’t the only hurdle in improving NFT discovery. The path to source the Metadata is also stored differently in on and off-chain instances. 

In off-chain instances metadata is often stored in a URL that links to the metadata indirectly. Along with no standardization of this metadata, these links can go offline or have complicated paths which makes it difficult to parse the data. 

While metadata on-chain is technically a better way to store necessary data, it is still expensive in comparison to off-chain.

3. Metadata siloed on multiple chains

NFT ecosystems are siloed from one another in metadata, content and communities which further hinders internet citizen’s ability to search and obtain optimal results across chains. The internet is going multichain and Web3’s NFT Metadata Standard should be multi-chain too. 

4. Lack of compounding metadata knowledge and relationships 

People search and interact with NFTs everyday, yet this knowledge is never captured. An NFT’s history should be added to enrich the NFTs metadata to help the next person find what they’re looking for!